Silver Images Vermont

Posted by on Jan 10, 2011 in Portfolio

Silver Images Vermont

This is a photography portfolio website for local photographer Patrica Braine. The challenge with this website was creating slideshows that were consistent in size and orientation even though there was a huge volume of beautiful photographs to choose from. The horizontal slideshows ended up being the preferred choice.

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Nunyuns Bakery

Posted by on Jan 10, 2011 in Portfolio

Nunyuns Bakery

This was one of Champlain Host’s first customers. Using photos from an afternoon photo shoot, I tweaked an existing theme to incorporate the client’s food photos. A custom Facebook application was also created to draw posts from the client’s Facebook Page into the...

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Jarvis, McArthur & Williams

Posted by on Jan 10, 2011 in Portfolio

Jarvis, McArthur & Williams

Law Firm websites are usually pretty straight forward. Getting content from the client was the biggest challenge here. I made a few questionnaires for the lawyers that helped draw out the information I needed in order to write the content with SEO in mind. The photography was easy compared to that.

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Using Google Sites for Project Management

Posted by on Jan 5, 2011 in Tutorials

In this tutorial, I am writing with the following hosting and registrar configuration: registrar is for domain registration only. Hosting provider is where I have control over my email (MX Records) and domain redirection (CNAME Records). I use GoDaddy as a registrar and Bluehost for hosting (though this also applies to HostGator). History Google Apps have been around a while, and we’ve seen more than a few of these “apps” come and go, like Orkut. The mainstays have survived the test of time and been improved upon to the point where they are becoming indispensable, at least to me. First, of course, is Gmail. While you might not think of it as one of the Google apps, it is indeed an application, albeit a common one. There are several web based email applications to choose from (Yahoo, Hotmail, AOL, etc.), and some may have better features than Gmail, but these are not part of a suite of applications, and therefore not integrated. Google Docs has been part of the Google Apps family since 2007, and has slowly developed into a fairly robust word processor. While it lacks some of the more dynamic features of Microsoft Word, its cloud based nature has made it far more useful for collaboration. The ability to share documents online is something Microsoft has only very recently begun to mimic. Google Sites is a relatively recent addition (2008) the family, and for the purposes of this article, the most important. With Google Sites, you create a workspace that people of all levels of technical expertise can use to collaborate on projects of nearly any size. Project managers can quickly set up an environment where the people collaborating can immediately begin to share documents and comments, upload files of any type, and be notified when any changes or additions have been made to the site. I saw Google Sites as the key element in this mix to free myself of having to wade through my inbox for instructions, comments and attachments relating to a project. It also saves me from opening one email at a time to see the progression of an idea or task over time. Use The biggest initial obstacle to getting clients and collaborators to adapt to this system is, in my mind, the need for a Gmail/Google account. With clients especially, sometimes asking someone to remember a new username and password for another email account is like asking an acquaintance to help you move (see Keith Hernandez on Seinfeld). Collaborators, especially fellow web developers, should have no problem with using their existing Gmail account or adding a new one. Fortunately, if you set up a Google Apps account with your domain name, you can create email accounts for your users on your own, and simply set the email account under your domain to forward to their favorite email address. When the project...

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